The 3 Stages of Healing an Injury | South Bay Pain Doctors

The 3 Stages of Healing an Injury

Most typical injuries are referred to as musculoskeletal injuries, or what occurs when there is damage to the muscular or skeletal systems. These types of injuries include (but are not limited to) fractures, sprains, and pulled or overworked muscles. While the length and particularities of healing time differs depending on the injury, here are the […]

Most typical injuries are referred to as musculoskeletal injuries, or what occurs when there is damage to the muscular or skeletal systems. These types of injuries include (but are not limited to) fractures, sprains, and pulled or overworked muscles.

While the length and particularities of healing time differs depending on the injury, here are the phases of healing in order for you to gauge where you yourself are at on an individual level:

1. Protection/Inflammatory Phase

Right after becoming injured when pain is at it’s height your body’s first instinct will be to protect that area from further injury. If not treated or medicated correctly, inflammation can hinder sleep. Pain, swelling and redness are typical of this first phase, but are an important part of the healing process

Time frame: about 2-4 days following the injury. But of course this depends on how you yourself go about treating the injured area in the following days.

2. Repair Phase

This is when the inflammation turns into a repairing of the injured areas. During this phase it is imperative to have movement in the injured area in order to have full range of motion— which is where the docs at South Bay Pain Docs come in handy. New tissues and muscles are still weak at this point, and if not moved can result in restricted motion. During this phase, you’re also still very vulnerable to re-injury.

Time frame: Up to 6 weeks following injury, while your body is busy creating new tissue

3. Remodeling Phase

While visibly healing may seem and feel like it’s finished after the Repair Phase, it does not. Now that you have your newly healed tissue and your soft tissue, the increased demand on your body may not match the capabilities of this new tissue, this is because your body senses that the newly healed part is still weaker than it’s counterparts, so additional new tissue is grown in order to support the existing healed tissue until physical functions are normalized. Challenging muscles with strength training at this time is very important— It should be gentle yet something that builds over time.

Time frame: Between 6 weeks and 3 months